Plant-derived silica nanoparticles and composites for biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and supercapacitors: a review

Prabha, S.; Durgalakshmi, D.; Rajendran, Saravanan; Lichtfouse, Eric

Abstract

Silica nanoparticles have rapidly found applications in medicine, supercapacitors, batteries, optical fibers and concrete materials, because silica nanoparticles have tunable physical, chemical, optical and mechanical properties. In most applications, high-purity silica comes from synthetic organic precursors, yet this approach could be costly, polluting and non-biocompatible. Alternatively, natural silica sources from biomass are often cheap and abundant, yet they contain impurities. Silica can be extracted from corn cob, coffee husk, rice husk, sugarcane bagasse and wheat husk wastes, which are often disposed of in rivers, lands and ponds. These wastes can be used to prepare homogenous silica nanoparticles. Here we review properties, preparation and applications of silica nanoparticles. Preparation includes chemical and biomass methods. Applications include biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and supercapacitors. In particular, to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, recent research has shown that silver nanocluster/silica deposited on a mask reduces SARS-Cov-2 infectivity to zero.

Más información

Título según WOS: Plant-derived silica nanoparticles and composites for biosensors, bioimaging, drug delivery and supercapacitors: a review
Título de la Revista: Environmental Chemistry Letters
Volumen: 19
Número: 2
Editorial: SPRINGER HEIDELBERG
Fecha de publicación: 2020
DOI:

10.1007/S10311-020-01123-5

Notas: ISI