Decreased frugivory and seed germination rate do not reduce seedling recruitment rates of Aristotelia chilensis in a fragmented forest

Valdivia, CE; Simonetti, JA

Abstract

Habitat fragmentation reduces frugivorous bird abundance. Such a reduction may lead to a reduction in seed dispersal, thereby compromising seedling recruitment rate with far reaching consequences for plant population persistence. We assessed frugivory, seed germination, and seedling recruitment rates in a fragmented forest of central Chile by comparing a continuous forest with four forest fragments surrounded by pine plantations. Frugivory was 2.4 times higher in continuous forest than in forest fragments. Seeds eaten by birds germinated 1.7 and 3.7 times higher than non-eaten seeds from continuous forest and fragments respectively. Non-eaten seeds from continuous forest germinated 2.2 times higher than those from forest fragments, suggesting inbreeding depression. However, seedling recruitment rates at forest fragments were far higher than in continuous forest where no seedling recruited in the five years analysed. Therefore, despite forest fragmentation negatively affected frugivory, it did not translate into a decreased fitness of plants, thus highlighting the importance of considering the overall processes leading the reproductive success of plants following anthropogenic disturbances. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

Más información

Título según WOS: Decreased frugivory and seed germination rate do not reduce seedling recruitment rates of Aristotelia chilensis in a fragmented forest
Título según SCOPUS: Decreased frugivory and seed germination rate do not reduce seedling recruitment rates of Aristotelia chilensis in a fragmented forest
Título de la Revista: Biodiversity and Conservation
Volumen: 16
Número: 6
Editorial: Springer
Fecha de publicación: 2007
Página de inicio: 1593
Página final: 1602
Idioma: English
URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10531-006-9007-z
DOI:

10.1007/s10531-006-9007-z

Notas: ISI, SCOPUS